• Slideshow 1

    Mojave Desert Heritage & Cultural Association

Riley's Truck

RILEY'S TRUCK DONATED TO CULTURAL CENTER

18 December 2012. J. Riley Bembry's 1934 Chevy flatbed truck is an important East Mojave Desert mining artifact.    (Photo by Hugh Brown.)

Riley-Bembry-Truck-arrives-in-GoffsBridget (Sandoz) Wilcox of Yucca Valley donated the truck she inherited from John Riley Bembry when he died in 1984. Riley used the 1934 1 1/2-ton Chevrolet flatbed pickup to travel between his many mining claims in the Ivanpah Mountains and his nearby home known as Riley's Camp.

MDHCA director Dave Taylor inspected the truck stored in Hinkley, reported it was in excellent condition, and made arrangements for transporting it to Goffs. Dave and his friend Mike Pike loaded the truck on a double-axle trailer and arrived in Goffs this same day. Riley's truck has been appropriately placed between the Stotts and American Boy stamp mills here on the grounds of the Goffs Cultural Center for all to admire.

You can read the entire article on Riley and the truck retrieval in the East Mojave Heritage section of the latest Mojave Road Report number 292.

New MDHCA Logos

NEW MDHCA LOGOS

12 October 2012. The 33rd Annual Mojave Road Rendezvous was the occasion for the unveiling of two new updated logos for the Mojave Desert Heritage and Cultural Association. MDHCA President Steve Mongrain led the execution of this effort and thus ensured that they would be available to the membership in the form of decals in time for the Rendezvous. Here is the text of Steve's presentation to the gathered audience:


2012 MDHCA Logo


Earlier this year, Dennis recommended that the Board of Directors develop a logo with a motto for the Mojave Desert Heritage and Cultural Association, what marketing types would call a “brand,” a picture that depicts who we are and what we are about. Here’s what we came up with.
 
The one above will be used for more formal needs; letterhead, envelopes, formal letters, items where we wish to express the historical aspects of the Goffs Cultural Center.
 
The second one here on the left will be used for more informal items; caps, decals, shirts. The creative folks tell me the maroon color has a close resemblance to red/brown associated with the color of the Earth, the beige with the sand of the desert itself.
 
The Joshua Tree symbolizes the Mojave Desert, what causes us all to be here. It symbolizes the Mojave Road, the East Mojave Heritage Trail, and the numerous historical sites throughout the East Mojave, our “boots on the ground” work.
 
The rendering of the Schoolhouse symbolizes our major goal, the preservation of the history and culture of the Mojave Desert and surrounding area. It speaks to the Mojave Desert Archives and the 19 collections housed here, the more than 120,000 historical photographs, the 6,000+ volumes, 5,000 maps, more than 700 oral and transcribed interviews, and numerous manuscripts, periodicals, pamphlets, digital databases, etc. And it speaks to the Dennis G. Casebier Library on the north side of the campus that houses much of this data. It further represents the Goffs Cultural Center campus, and all the wonderful historic antiquities on the grounds here.
 
The Latin phrase, Non Nobis Solum, was requested specifically by Dennis. Some years ago, a group of us were meeting at the Casebier residence across the way here. We were discussing then, as we continue to discuss today, PRESENCE here at the Goffs Cultural Center. You may have read in either the Goffsgram or Mojave Road Report that we are often in need of people to be here, generally at least four or more people all the time as this place is far too important to leave unattended at any time.
 
Anyway, someone at the meeting mentioned to Dennis that most people don’t have the passion he does regarding the MDHCA, and therefore not to expect lots of volunteers. I will always recall Dennis’ answer. He said that he didn't expect lots of volunteers because he had learned over the years that committed people show up “one person at a time.”
 
Dennis remarked that “many people have no passion for anything, and therefore why not be part of a movement far greater than just yourself? Why not pitch in and help an organization that records the history of Americans in the Mojave Desert for the benefit of generations to come? Do a little, or do a lot, but jump in. Give back and participate.”
 
Those were important words, and hence our motto, Non Nobis Solum, which translated means, “NOT FOR OURSELVES ALONE.” A special note of thanks goes to fellow Board member John Fickewirth and his associate, Jim Earley, for their design assistance.

Alexander Wagon Restored

HISTORIC ALEXANDER WAGON RESTORED

30 May 2011. Hugh Brown horses around with John Harrington, Jo Ann Casebier, Lena the dog, and the historic Alexander Wagon donated by Dottie Lewis and restored by John Harrington. (Photo by Dennis G. Casebier)

Restored Alexander WagonSome of you may remember that about a year ago (as reported in the Mojave Road Report) a crew went up to Pinto Valley to the property of Dottie Lewis and retrieved a wagon she had donated to us. This wagon was hand-built by Pinto Valley homesteader Julius Alexander in the mid-1920s.

When we brought it down to Goffs it was in very bad condition. Most of the wood had rotted. John Harrington was looking for a challenging project. He took on the task of restoring that wagon. You see the result in the photo above. John estimates he spent about 1,200 hours working on the restoration.

Restored Alexander Wagon on displayThe wagon is now on display in Goffs as a testimonial to Julius Alexander’s workmanship, to Dottie Lewis’ generosity, and to John Harrington’s craftsmanship.

American Boy Stamp Mill Erected

AMERICAN BOY STAMP MILL FRAME ERECTED

10 March 2012. Once again, the skyline of Goffs has changed. (Photo by Dennis G. Casebier)

Flag draped American Boy MillYesterday, the American Boy Stamp Mill crew from Phoenix, Arizona, were here for several days working on the mill. During the day they got the two battery boxes and the main frame of the mill set up on the foundation. It was a delicate operation because the battery boxes had to fit down perfectly over an array of threaded bolts sticking up out of the concrete. It worked perfectly, thanks for the careful measuring and positioning of the bolts prior to pouring of the concrete last October.

Then today, we were all out at the mill site early while the Rock’s Crane Service crew lifted the big bull wheels and cam shafts into place on the frame. That was another delicate operation that took a couple of hours. This is a major step forward but, as Charlie Connell cautions us, there is a lot of work yet to do. It will likely be a year or more before we’ll be able to throw a switch and operate this huge machine. But we got much of the heavy lifting done today.

The American Boy Stamp Mill crew, headed up by Charlie Connell with wife Kathy, were Morris Jackson, Roger Camplin, Jerry Ohlund, and Stuart Harrah, supported by Ed Ditmer, Gail Andress, Nance Fite, and Mickey Thompson. Rock’s Crane Service consisted of Dave Rock, Mike Rock, and Jimmy Howell, from Bullhead City, Arizona.

See the American Boy Stamp Mill report.

Metal Building

NEW METAL BUILDING

29 March 2012. A Door Company puts the final touches installing the roll-up door on the new metal building. (Photo by Dennis G. Casebier)

Finished Metal BuildingShane Brown, Jake Harmon and John Veria from H.S. Brown Construction erected a large metal Quonset hut-shaped building procured for us by MDHCA Director John M. Fickewirth.

Over the course of one month the construction crew got the building up. Starting the week of March 5, they worked on the intricate framing needed for the concrete base of the metal building.

Finishing concrete for the metal building slabOn March 9, two work crews received two concrete trucks laden with 10 yards of concrete to pour the metal building slab. By March 29 the building was completed.