• Slideshow 1

    Mojave Desert Heritage & Cultural Association

Mojave Road Detour over Piute Range

MOJAVE ROAD DETOUR OVER PIUTE RANGE

3 August 2018: Mojave National Preserve announced the Mojave Road Between Piute and Lanfair Valleys through the Piute Range has been repaired and reopened.

25 April 2016. From the Mojave Desert Heritage and Cultural Association

Leiser Ray Detour Map

Map of 14.2 mile detour around Mojave Road closure. Click image to download. [Chris S. Ervin 2016]

As of April 19, 2016, the National Park Service has closed the Mojave Road between Mile 27.0 and 30.5 in the Mojave National Preserve. This closure is due to a washout on the old underground telephone cable road connecting Piute Valley with Lanfair Valley. No date has been set for completion of repairs to the road.

The National Park Service recommends a 29-mile bypass on their Web page. We, the publishers of the official Mojave Road Guide have developed an alternate 14.2-mile detour for Mojave Road travelers who would prefer a shorter, more historic and scenic route. A PDF with a map and road log is available for download here.

Spring in the Mojave 2016

SPRING IN The MOJAVE 2016

March 2016. Thanks to some well-timed rainfall, the East Mojave is experiencing a beautiful spring.

2016 Spring Mojave Yucca 540Mojave Yucca blooming in front of the Goffs Schoolhouse. Click image for more (Photos by Chris and Leslie Ervin)

At the end of March we had a local "superbloom" of wildflowers just down the road from the Goffs Schoolhouse (click on attached photo). In addition to the very obvious yellow brittle bush everywhere, we identified another dozen or so desert plants blooming.

Click here or on the photo for an album of East Mojave spring 2016 photos.

Afton Canyon Mojave River Crossing

MOJAVE ROAD DEEP RIVER CROSSING DETOUR

Spring 2019: Recommended Alternate Route for Afton Canyon River Crossing

Mojave River Deep Water Crossing in Afton Canyon 2019

April 19, 2019. Mojave River, Afton Canyon, Deep Water Crossing. [Photo By John Marnell]

From time to time the water level in two places along the Mojave Road within Afton Canyon has become deeper than some people are comfortable driving through. There have been reports of the water running as high as 30+ inches. These two crossings are described in the Mojave Road Guide as at miles 120.5 and 121.5 – a quarter mile south of the BLM Campground.

Coming from the east, you can follow the below directions thus avoiding these potential problem areas. Those driving the Mojave Road from west to east would simply reverse the instructions. The historical and cultural significance as well as the special beauty of Afton Canyon can be enjoyed but may require a bit of backtracking. A PDF of the road log is available for download here.

2019 Afton Canyon Alternate Route

A map of the above route is available for download here.

DGC Video: History of Goffs

DENNIS CASEBIER: HISTORY OF GOFFS

July 2013. From the porch of the restored Goffs Schoolhouse, desert author and historian Dennis Casebier gives a talk on the fascinating heritage of the Eastern Mojave Desert.

History-of-Goffs-Collage-480

Brief History of the East Mojave and the Goffs Cultural Center

Featuring historical and modern images, this series of six short videos encapsulates the rich history of Goffs at the "top of the hill" where old Route 66 and two railroads intersect.

1. Introduction 6:33

2. The Railroad and Route 66 5:30

3. The Mojave Road and the Goffs Schoolhouse 6:27

4. Schoolhouse closed 1937, WWII Desert Training Center 7:10

5. 1990s: Formation of the MDHCA 6:49

6. MDHCA Mission: "This is what we do" 6:08

Produced by David Edholm for the MDHCA.

Online Exhibits

NEW ONLINE EXHIBIT

May 2013. Desert Waysides: Burton Frasher's California Route 66

Barstow-California-1931-title-480

Photographer Burton Frasher (1888-1955) combined a passion for automobile travel and photography into a postcard business that proved popular with motoring tourists. Frasher documented the remote Route 66 roadside businesses that sustained, and natural wonders that awed, anxious travelers across the Mojave Desert in the 1930s and 1940s. This selection of photographic postcards focus on the desert wayside stops and scenic vistas that motorists rushed through on the last leg of their journey west.
(Curated by Chris Ervin)